Celebrating Rakshabandhan: Make your own Rakhi

Rakshabandhan is an Inidan holiday that celebrates the special bond between brothers and sisters (Raksha meaning protection, bandhan meaning bond). Traditionally on this day, a sister tied a bracelet called rakhi on her brother’s wrist to reaffirm his eternal commitment to protect and love her. While this still holds true, over the generations, Rakshabandhan has become more of a mutual promise of love and support between not just brothers and sisters, but any two people who care for each other. My Rakhi Family episode #4824 by Sesame Street sums up the sentiment beautifully so watch it if you haven’t already.

Rakshabandhan is on August 15th this year (which also happens to be India’s Independence Day), and even if you are not Indian, what a fun day to celebrate some love with your siblings and besties! Rakhi’s are sold in all Indian grocery stores around this time of the year, but if you are really in the mood for some DIY fun, may I have a few unconventional but fun ways to make Rakhi bracelets which will add a lot of cheer to your celebrations.

Construction Paper and Gemstones Rakhi

Use colorful construction paper to cut out shapes, layer colors, cut frills, and embelish with gems. Use a hot glue gun to firmly stick your creation on a ribbion.

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Stiff Felt

One of the most versatile craft supply ever, stiff felt comes in many vibrant colors and keeps its shape when cut into various sizes. Since there are no embelishments, this makes a perfect bracelet for younger kids.

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Fuse Beads

I have no become one of those people who wants to make everything out of fuse beads. They are so much fun! I created some fun shapes before ironing them and using hot glue gun to stick them on a ribbon.

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Pipe Cleaners and Beads

This one was super easy to make since all it required was threading beads onto a pipe-cleaner. This is the bracelet to reach for if your little one doesn’t yet know how to tie a knot but wants to do it “on my own” anyway. Just be mindful to bend the wire ends into themselves so as not to scratch anyone.

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There are a million other ways to do this I am sure! So if you are planning to create your own rakhis this year, please make sure to tag me at @Hello.Namaste.World to show off.

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Happy Rakshabahan to all of you, and especially to all my cousin brothers all around the world. I love you very much and pray that happiness and kindness always be with you.

Chika GujarathiComment